Search What's New Info Request Feedback Comments Links FAQ Woods Order Form

Finniwig Studios Catalog

Lucet Instructions
 

     Lucets have been used since the 1650's to make a square non-elastic chain or cord. The unique craft is small and gives a lady something to do with her hands and to occupy a lady's time. The cords were used as drawstrings for bags, used in upholstery, as jewelry, or as chains to hang lockets, watches, and eyeglasses. Sailors used a larger version to make ropes for their ships when out at sea. By the late 1800's the lucet was losing popularity as commercial cording was being produced and could be purchased for less money.

     A lucet, sometimes called a chain fork or hayfork, is a lyre-shaped device that is flat and two-pronged. Some lucets have a handle for ease of use. The size of the chain could be fine or coarse, depending on the size and sturdiness of the lucet and the nature of the thread or yarn. A hole in the base of the lucet guides the finished braid and usually indicates the size of the cord that can be made.

Making a cord:     To work you lucet, hold it in your left hand with the ball of thread in your right hand. The end of the thread is passed through the hole (figure 1C) from back (figure 1A) to front (figure 1B) and secured by holding it with your thumb. Wind thread in front of and then behind the right horn (figure 1D), in front of and behind the left horn (figure 1E), then right again creating a figure eight (figure 1F). Bring the cord out behind the right horn. This top thread on the right hand horn is the working thread (figure 1G).
     With the right thumb and forefinger grasp the back of the lower right horn loop, slip it over the working thread (figure 2H) and over the top of the horn. Pull the working thread to the right to tighten the loop against the horn (figure 3H).
Pull the working thread to the right to tighten the loop against the horn (figure 3H). Grasping the thread from behind the horn loosens the loop. Grasping the thread from the front of the horn tightens the previous stitch down to the cord.
     The lucet is then turned around in the hand bringing the right horn forward from the right to left. The thread and know are pulled across and tightened against what is now the right horn (figure 4H). With the thumb and forefinger of the right hand grasp the back of the lower right horn loop, slip it over the working thread and over the top of the horn. The process continues as before until the desired length is achieved.
     To end the cord, instead of lifting the loop, cut the thread, leaving about a six-inch tail. Thread the tail down through the loop on the right hand horn. Slip the loop off the horn, and pull on the thread until the loop closes. Now thread the tail down through the loop on the left hand horn. Slip the loop off the horn, and pull on the thread until the loop closes.

     Your finished braid should be a square cord that looks like knit or chain stitches on all four sides.

 

 

Books Card Weaving Fiber Craft Kits Instructions Knitting Looms Kumihimo Kits Kumihimo Supplies Looms Miscellaneous Items Nalebinding Needlework Tools Netting Sewing Supplies Shuttles & Beaters Spindle & Nostepinde Stick Weaving Storage Bags Thread Winders

 

Finniwig Studios

Ariadne's Threads Guild
Chuck and Nancy Tubbs
19500 Co Rd 14
Bristol, IN 46507-9405
574-848-1322

Send mail to chucktubbs@prodigy.net with questions or comments about this web site.
Copyright 2003 Finniwig Studios
Last modified: 10/11/09