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Netting Instructions
 

Netting can be done with a netting needle for small netting spaces or a netting shuttle for larger netting spaces. The size of the mesh stick used determines the size of the netting space. Experiment with different sizes to find your preference for your particular project.

Netting can be used to create shopping bags, hairnets, fishing nets, hammocks, or backgrounds for filet lace. The size of the mesh stick you use and the size and type of threads you use will determine how your finished project will look. Threads can be anything from bobbin thread to kite string, twine and rope, depending on the final purpose of your project.

Threading the shuttle: There is a variety of different netting shuttles. Below are two types. Do not overfill the shuttles. Too much string will make it too bulky to pass through the meshes.

1. Stick Netting Shuttle. Wind the thread around the shuttle lengthwise, making sure the thread goes into the slot on each end.
2. Fish Netting Shuttle. Hold the string against the body of the shuttle. Run the string up and around the prong and down the same side of the body. Then around the bottom heel between the two projections, up the back of the shuttle and around the prong again. Continue until the shuttle is filled.
Starting the netting: Netting always starts with a foundation loop. Take a length of the string, fold it over, and make a slip knot. The loop above the knot will be the foundation loop. The loose end of the string will be woven into the mesh (for a round item leave the loose end of the string longer than you plan to make the item). Hook the loop over a nail, doorknob, or other stationary object to provide tension.
Making the netting knot on the foundation: Place the mesh stick below the knot and in front of the loose end (short end) of the string. Bring the working end of the string (string from the shuttle) over the front of the mesh stick, then under and behind the stick.
Now pass the working string through the foundation loop from the back to the front. Hold the string in place at the top of the mesh stick and take the string to the left, then to the right (forming a loop on the left side of the foundation loop), staying in front of the foundation loop.
Take the string around the right side to the back to the front through the loop you made on the left side.
Bring the working string down in front of the mesh stick, making certain that the netting knot has seated itself correctly next to the slip knot.
Continue in this fashion until you have the desired number of loops on the foundation loop. Continue to the round or square netting instructions.
Round netting (such as for a bag or doily)
Remove the mesh stick. Pass the loose string through the remaining foundation loop. Gently pull the string until the foundation loop tightens and the mesh forms a circle.

Tie the loose end and the working string in a square or reef knot close to the top next to the netting knots.

To form your last loop tie the loose end and the working string together in an overhand knot even with the lower edge of the other loops.
To keep the tension, tie the center to a stationary item. A small disk or button works well, as the project can rotate as you work.

Place the mesh stick under the overhand knot with the loose string behind the mesh stick and the working string in front of the mesh stick.

Make a netting knot on the first loop. Continue making netting knots in each loop until you reach the end of the row (see Netting Knot on rows). (See Increase Knot and Decrease Knot to increase or decrease the length of the row). Make your last loop by tying the loose end and the working string together in an overhand knot, even with the lower edge of the other loops.

Continue making rows until your mesh is the size you wanted. If your project is flat, finish it off with the overhand knot. If your project is not flat (such as a bag), then you may wish to make your last row of loops the same as the desired width of the diamond spaces created and use a decorative knot on this row to spruce up the edge (see Decorative Edges) or to attach a handle (see Bag Handles).
Square or Rectangle Netting:

Start with one loop on your foundation. Turn mesh over so the working string is to your left. Place the mesh stick below the loop with the working string on top of the stick. Make the first knot in the first loop (include the working string coming down from the above knot into the new knot).

Continue making netting knots in each loop until you reach the end of the row (see making the netting knot on rows). Always turn mesh over before starting a new row so the working string is to your left. Increase each row at the end of the row until your mesh is the width you desire (see Increase Knot). Then start increasing at the end of one row and decreasing at the end of the next row until the desired length of your mesh is achieved (see Decrease Knot). The decrease at the end of every row until only two loops remain. Pass string through both loops and tie together with a double knot and clip off the excess string..
Making the netting knots on rows:

Place the mesh stick below the knots with the working string over the front of the mesh stick, then under and behind the stick.

Now pass the working string through the next mesh loop, of the above row, from the back to the front. Hold the string in place at the top of the mesh stick and take the string to the left, then to the right (forming a loop on the left side of the mesh loop), staying in front of the mesh loop.

Take the string around the right side to the back of the mesh loop, then back to the front through the loop you made on the left side.

Continue creating new loops until you reach the end of the row (see Round Netting or Square Netting for instructions on going to a new row).

Increasing Knots:

Place the mesh stick below the knots with the working string over the front of the mesh stick, then under and behind the stick.

Now pass the working string through the next mesh loop, of the above row, from the back to the front. Pass over the front of the mesh stick again, then under and behind the stick. Now pass the working string through the same mesh loop, of the above row, from the back to the front. Hold the string in place at the top of the mesh stick and take the string to the left, then to the right (forming a loop on the left side of the mesh loop), staying in front of the mesh loop.

Take the string around the right side to the back of the mesh loop, then back to the front through the loop you made on the left side.

Decreasing Knots:

Place the mesh stick below the knots with the working string over the front of the mesh stick, then under and behind the stick.

Now pass the working string through the next two mesh loops, of the above row, from the back to the front. Hold the string in place at the top of the mesh stick and take the string to the left, then to the right (forming a loop on the left side of the mesh loop), staying in front of the loop.

Take the string around the right side to the back of the mesh loop, then back to the front through the loop you made on the left side.

Attaching new string:

If your project is square or rectangle, it is best to attach new string at the end of a row. If your project is round you can attach a new string anywhere. There are a variety of ways to attach a new string.

1. Make a loose slip knot on the end of the new string. Slide the old thread through the slip knot as far as possible. Pull the slip knot tight around the old string, and then give it an extra pull so it "pops" the old string through the slip know. Cut off the ends.

2. Finish the old string with a netting knot as usual. With the new string, work another netting knot into the same mesh, directly above the knots made with the old string. Cut off ends.

3. Continue with the old string and the new string as one for three or four more knots. Then cut off ends.

Decorative edges:

Edges can be finished in any way you imagine. They can be left as is for a simple look or just sew some webbing along the edge. Knots can also be used to finish an edge.

Try using a double half-hitch knot. Pass working string over and around top string, leaving a small loop at left, then bring string through loop from back to front. Then pass working string under and around top string, then down through loop created in front. Pull tight. Repeat this step until edge is complete.

Handles:

Handles can also be made with web or string. For webbing, just fold the end of the webbing under the loop to the back and up. Sew along the end of the webbing through both layers.

With string tie a knot on a loop. Take the working string to the opposite side of the bag and tie a knot to another loop, leaving the string long enough for a handle. Return to the opposite side and tie another knot in the loop beside the first knot, then back across, and tie a knot in the loop beside the second knot. You should now have two strings going from one side of your bag to the other side. If you would like a thicker handle, continue adding strings. To finish off, start at one end and tie double-half hitch knots, or any other knot desired, along the handle until you reach the opposite end. Clip string ends.

 

 

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Finniwig Studios

Ariadne's Threads Guild
Chuck and Nancy Tubbs
19500 Co Rd 14
Bristol, IN 46507-9405
574-848-1322

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Copyright 2003 Finniwig Studios
Last modified: 10/11/09